WE WILL BE HOLDING A SPECIAL SHOW DURING THE SCV NATIONAL REUNION, JULY 18-21, 2018.

1584 Lakemont Drive, Grayson, GA 30017
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D & K Prints

Our Newest Addition to the Gallery

Goose Creek Bridge

 

General JEB Stuart

Near Middleburg, Virginia 

June 21, 1863


General Robert E. Lee began what would become known as the Gettysburg campaign in the early days of June 1863. He carefully marched the Army of Northern Virginia across the Blue Ridge Mountains and into the Shenandoah Valley. Detection by the enemy was one of General Lee’s main concerns. He gave his Cavalry Commander Major General JEB Stuart, the assignment of screening the army’s movements by operating on the eastern side of the Blue Ridge Mountains. General Stuart would need to keep Federal Cavalry from discovering the Army of Northern Virginia heading north into Maryland and on into Pennsylvania.


At the same time, US Major General Joseph Hooker gave orders to his Cavalry Commander Brigadier General Alfred Pleasonton. “The commanding general relies upon you…to give him information of where the enemy is, his force, and his movements…It is better that we should lose men than to be without knowledge of the enemy, as we now seem to be.”


The opposing cavalry forces found each other on June 17th, and the running battles from Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville lasted through the 21st.


Cavalry charges and counter charges were frequent. Engagements were fast and ferocious. General Stuart directed most of the fighting, employing lightning tactical charges and then giving ground to delay the larger federal force’s advance. This bought valuable time needed for General Lee’s army to march without being discovered.


On June 21st, the Goose Creek bridge, located between the towns of Middleburg and Upperville on the Ashby Gap Turnpike, became a choke point that was a focus of the opposing forces. The four-arched stone bridge spanning that waterway was a perfect location for General Stuart to slow the Federal advance. Facing 7000 Cavalry and infantry troops, Stuart, with the help of General Wade Hampton, strategically placed cannon on the west side of the bridge holding off the federals for two hours until they in turn brought up their own cannon. A devastating artillery duel ensued until the Confederates retired to the next high ground to the west. General Stuart’s stand at the bridge gave him time to consolidate his force east of Upperville, where he again delayed the Federal advance.


General Stuart’s skill succeeded in preventing General Pleasonton’s men from discovering the Army of Northern Virginia’s invasion north across the Potomac River. The battle of Gettysburg would begin just 10 days after the clash at Goose Creek. General Stuart’s next challenge would be to somehow get around the Federal forces and join General Lee somewhere to the north.

Descriptions of the Art in the Gallery

New Releases

These are the latest releases from John Paul Strain and only available through licensed dealers.

Artist's Proofs and Printers Proofs

What is an Artist’s Proof (AP)? An Artist's proof has a perceived higher value in the market place due to their limited supply and availability. The Artist's proof edition is signified with "Artist Proof" or "AP" in front of the number (AP 1/5). 


What is a Printer's Proof (AP)? A Printer's Proof also has a perceived higher value in the market place due to their limited supply and availability. The Printer's Proof edition is signified with "Printer's Proof" or "PP" in front of the number (PP 1/5). 


The prints by John Paul Strain are done on lithographic paper. Artist’s Proof prints are unique because John Paul Strain prints two small Remarque paintings in the white border at the bottom of the prints. 

Framed and Unframed Lithographs

What is a S/N Limited Edition Print? A John Paul Strain S/N Limited Edition Print is a signed and numbered edition of identical prints numbered sequentially and individually signed by John Paul Strain, having a limit to the number in the edition. These S/N Limited Edition Prints and Artist’s proof prints are produced using museum quality inks and pH neutral (acid-free) paper. All of our prints are accompanied by a certificate of authenticity. 

Canvas Giclée

What is a Canvas Giclée? John Paul Strain's canvas giclée (pronounced zhee-CLAY) is an individually produced, high-resolution, high-fidelity reproduction done on a special large format printer. Giclée is a French term that means "spray of ink" and is produced from digital scans of the original artwork. More than four million droplets per second in a fine stream of ink is sprayed onto a specially treated canvas. Our giclées have passed the 75-year ink-fade test and are produced on acid free, pH balanced archival canvas. Each giclée is hand-signed by John Paul Strain and includes a "Certificate of Authenticity."  The Canvas Giclée will be signed and numbered.

Paper Giclée

What is a Paper Giclée? John Paul Strain's paper giclée (pronounced zhee-CLAY) is an individually produced, high-resolution, high-fidelity reproduction done on a special large format printer. Giclée is a French term that means "spray of ink" and is produced from digital scans of the original artwork. More than four million droplets per second in a fine stream of ink is sprayed onto a specialty paper. Our giclées have passed the 75-year ink-fade test and are produced on acid free, pH balanced archival canvas. Each giclée is hand-signed by John Paul Strain and includes a "Certificate of Authenticity." We custom frame John Paul Strain paper giclées.  

Specials

These are special pieces of John Paul Strain Art that we have available for you.