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1584 Lakemont Drive, Grayson, GA 30017

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D & K Prints

Latest Release --- Original Available --- Please Contact Us

Latest Release --- Original Available --- Please Contact Us

Latest Release --- Original Available --- Please Contact Us Latest Release --- Original Available --- Please Contact Us

Our Newest Additions to the Gallery

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Bloody Bill Anderson, Sgt. John Baker, John Jarrette, Jesse James, Frank James

Battle of Centralia, Missouri - September 27, 1864


The Civil War was fought differently in Kansas and Missouri than the rest of the country.  In Virginia, Maryland, and Tennessee, armies of thousands would face each other in great lines of battle.  In the West, battles were more often skirmishes of less than a couple of hundred men.  Guerrilla tactics, surprise attacks, and ambush were the tools of the day and southerners fought by the code of the feud.  The population had mixed loyalties between North or South, which caused suspicion as to who was friend or foe.  Adding to the confusion southern combatants often did not wear uniforms and sometimes dressed in federal jackets.  It was in the early summer of 1864 that a young 16 year old Jesse James joined Bloody Bill Anderson’s Raiders under the command of William Quantrill to ride with his older brother Frank.


On the afternoon of September 27th Anderson and about 80 of his men rode out of the federal town of Centralia, leaving behind death and destruction.  Much of the town was on fire and 22 non-combatant federal soldiers had been killed.


When Anderson and his men rejoined Captain George Todd’s cavalry unit back at camp, word spread of what had happened.  Captain Todd chastised Anderson for what had been done.  What they didn’t know was that the federals were already in pursuit.  Federal Major AVE Johnston commander of the 39th infantry were mounted and on the trail with about 155 troops.  After viewing the destruction and death in Centralia the federal commander vowed revenge, and a black flag was carried by his column indicating no quarter was to be given by his men for any wounded or captured prisoners.


Major Johnston’s column was soon discovered by Anderson’s rear guard scouts led by Dave Pool who galloped back to camp warning their brethren.  Instantly the camp jumped into action as Anderson’s and Todd’s raiders readied for battle.  As the rebels mounted their horses they formed into squads of ten to twenty men. Two miles from Centralia at the rise of a golden yellow hayfield the federals formed a line of battle on foot.  Johnston’s men were infantry soldiers carrying long-barreled, muzzle loading Enfield rifles.  Johnston ordered his men to fix bayonets.


Frank James would later recount, “John Koger, a funny fellow in our ranks, watched the Yankees get down from their horses, and said: ‘Why, the fools are going to fight on foot!  God help em.”  Anderson riding his new mount, smiled and leaned over to Archie Clement and said, “Not a damned revolver in the crowd!”  But actually commander Johnston stood next to his horse with a six shooter in his hand.


The troopers dismounted their horses, checked their equipment, tighten their horse’s girths, and remounted pulling their pistols.  At the command they moved forward in line, slowly at first.  The line move toward the enemy at a walk, then to a trot up the hill.  They heard the federal commander scream “ready aim fire!”  Frank James said when they heard the enemy officer’s command, “We were lying behind our horses (necks), a trick that Comanche Indians practiced.” When the federals fired their rifles nearly all the shots went over their heads.  But three raiders were hit.  Two of them, Richard Kinney and Frank Shepherd were Frank’s best friends riding on either side of him.  Shepherd was killed out right and fell from his horse.  Kinney was shot and pulled back, although he was able to cling to his horse.  He would die soon afterward.  Several horses went down as well. The federal line only got off only one shot.  At 200 yards Anderson shouted “Charge” and with a bloodcurdling rebel yell the line leaped into a thundering gallop.  Frank continued, “On up the hill, almost in the twinkling of an eye we were on the Yankee line.”  The federal line quickly broke and a wild panic of fighting and fleeing took place.  During the fight Jesse engaged and killed Major Johnston the union commander.  All the federals who stood their ground and fought were killed, including a number who ran away.  Ten of the raiders were wounded, a number had been bayoneted, and three were killed.  Describing the battle Frank James said, “We never met many Federal soldiers that would fight us on equal terms.  They would either outnumber us or would run away.”  The battle was Jesse’s first big victory. 


After the war, Jesse James and his brother Frank would become some of the most notorious and famous outlaws of the West.

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HOME ON BRADDOCK STREET

Stonewall Jackson, Anna Jackson & Anne Graham
Braddock Street - Winchester, VA - January 1862


General Stonewall Jackson was in high spirits during the snowy days of January 1862. He and his army had returned from successful expeditions to Bath and Romney. He learned that his men were strong and faithful through difficult and challenging days. The Federals in Northern Virginia had been shown that his army was not to be taken lightly.


Also to Stonewall’s delight, his wife Anna was in Winchester staying at the home of Reverend James R. Graham located on Braddock Street. For the first time General Jackson and Anna could be together for an extended period of time. The General’s headquarters and office were just up the street at the home of Lieutenant Colonel Lewis T. Moore, commander of the 31st Virginia Militia.


The Graham family home was the perfect place for the Jacksons to stay in Winchester. Fanny and James Graham were wonderful hosts and the General loved their three children, Anne, Alfred and William. The Jacksons were given the upstairs northeast corner of the house for their privacy. The family atmosphere at the Graham home was just the respite that the General needed from the stress and responsibilities of the military. The General would never conduct or discuss any military matters or business at the Graham home. If a courier or dispatch arrived, Jackson would direct the man to his office up the street.


General Jackson was a man of meticulous habits. He would arise at the same early hour every day and immediately go to his headquarters to attend to the mail and issue orders for the day. A few minutes before 8:00am he would return to the Graham’s home and escort his wife downstairs to breakfast.


Speaking of General Jackson, Reverend Graham would tell his parishioners that “he is really a member of my family. He ate every day at my table, slept every night under my roof and bowed with us morning and evening at our family alter. He called my house his home.”

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The Charming Lucy Buck at Bel Air

 General R. E. Lee with the Buck Family Bel Air House

Front Royal, VA - July 22, 1863 


It had been an arduous march south from the bloody fields of Gettysburg for the Army of Northern Virginia. Torrential rains had flooded the Potomac River delaying the southern army’s retreat to the relative safety of Virginia. With US General George Meade’s Federal forces closing in, Lee’s army was finally able to cross the Potomac on July 13th. Still in pursuit, General Meade’s cavalry crossed the Potomac farther down river, East of the Blue Ridge Mountains and began to occupy a number of passes around Loudoun County.


As hats, coats and uniforms began to dry out, the Army of Northern Virginia arrived at the Shenandoah River. Across the river was the town of Front Royal, and Lee ordered his engineers to quickly build another pontoon bridge. On July 22 the southern army crossed the bridge into Front Royal.


A wealthy businessman and prominent citizen of Front Royal, William M. Buck sought out General Lee at the pontoons, to invite him and his staff for refreshments at his home Bel Air House. Lee welcomed the kind invitation and rode to the manor house with some members of his staff. There he was introduced to the Buck family. Nineteen year old Lucy Buck wrote of the encounter in her diary. “The old gentleman greeted us with such a warm, fatherly manner.” General Lee along with his staff including Majors Taylor and Talcott enjoyed fresh buttermilk while Lucy and her sister Nellie entertained with songs of the south.


This brief respite of time with the Buck family had been most welcome for General Lee, but upon returning to his army he warned his staff, “We must now prepare for harder blows and harder work.”

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The Last Crossing

General Robert E. Lee & Major Walter H. Taylor
Falling Waters - Williamsport, Maryland - July 13, 1863

 

After the battle of Gettysburg, the Army of Northern Virginia retreated south in a torrential rain storm that lasted for two days. As General Robert E. Lee's army reached the Potomac River at Williamsport, they found a swollen, raging and impassable river. A pontoon bridge near the town had been broken up by a Federal raiding party leaving Lee's army in a perilous position. With the river so high some predicted it might be a week before the river could be crossed and Federal forces had already begun probing for an opening to attack. With the Potomac River to their backs, a full scale attack by US General Mead's army would be disastrous.

General Lee issued orders for his commanders to set up defensive positions around the army and prepare for battle. Soon a mixed force of Federal cavalry and artillery appeared threatening to capture wagons carrying wounded soldiers. General J.E.B. Stuart and his cavalry along with infantry were able to push back the enemy probe. Lee turned his attention to his wounded soldiers and ordered any ferry boats to begin transporting the injured to the south bank. Lee then gave Major J. A. Harman the  assignment to somehow rebuild the pontoon bridge.

General Lee wrote to his wife, "Had the river not unexpectedly risen, all would have been well with us; but God, in His all-wise providence, ruled otherwise, and our communications have been interrupted and almost cut off." By July 13 Lee's prayers were answered. The river had receded to about 4 feet and Major Harman had reconstructed the pontoon bridge using wood from old warehouses, and recovered boats from down river. General Lee decided to attempt the crossing of his army under the cover of night.

Disheartening to all it began to rain again that afternoon and by nightfall the men were facing another "pouring from the skies" wrote Col. Alexander. All night the army labored to cross the Potomac. General Lee sat on his horse at the north end of the bridge encouraging his men throughout the whole night. At times the rain came down so hard it was difficult to keep the three or four torches alight to guide the procession. The shaky bridge miraculously held together "as it swayed to and fro, lashed by the current."

By morning a great weight seemed to be lifted from General Lee's shoulders, as most of the army had crossed into Virginia safely. In the distance the guns of the rear guard under the command of General Henry Heath could be heard. Heath and Pender's battle at Falling Waters was soon over, and the rest of Army of Northern Virginia was back on home soil. This would be the southern army's last crossing of the Potomac River.

Descriptions of the Art in the Gallery

New Releases

These are the latest releases from John Paul Strain and only available through licensed dealers.

Artist's Proofs and Printers Proofs in Lithographs and Canvas

What is an Artist’s Proof (AP)? An Artist's proof has a perceived higher value in the market place due to their limited supply and availability. The Artist's proof edition is signified with "Artist Proof" or "AP" in front of the number (AP 1/5). 


What is a Printer's Proof (AP)? A Printer's Proof also has a perceived higher value in the market place due to their limited supply and availability. The Printer's Proof edition is signified with "Printer's Proof" or "PP" in front of the number (PP 1/5). 


The prints by John Paul Strain are done on lithographic paper. Artist’s Proof prints are unique because John Paul Strain prints two small Remarque paintings in the white border at the bottom of the prints. 

Framed and Unframed Lithographs

What is a S/N Limited Edition Print? A John Paul Strain S/N Limited Edition Print is a signed and numbered edition of identical prints numbered sequentially and individually signed by John Paul Strain, having a limit to the number in the edition. These S/N Limited Edition Prints and Artist’s proof prints are produced using museum quality inks and pH neutral (acid-free) paper. All of our prints are accompanied by a certificate of authenticity. 

Studio Canvas Giclée

What is a Canvas Giclée? John Paul Strain's canvas giclée (pronounced zhee-CLAY) is an individually produced, high-resolution, high-fidelity reproduction done on a special large format printer. Giclée is a French term that means "spray of ink" and is produced from digital scans of the original artwork. More than four million droplets per second in a fine stream of ink is sprayed onto a specially treated canvas. Our giclées have passed the 75-year ink-fade test and are produced on acid free, pH balanced archival canvas. Each giclée is hand-signed by John Paul Strain and includes a "Certificate of Authenticity."  The Studio Canvas Giclée will be signed and numbered. Approximately 17" x 24" in size.

Classic Canvas Giclée

What is a Canvas Giclée? John Paul Strain's paper giclée (pronounced zhee-CLAY) is an individually produced, high-resolution, high-fidelity reproduction done on a special large format printer. Giclée is a French term that means "spray of ink" and is produced from digital scans of the original artwork. More than four million droplets per second in a fine stream of ink is sprayed onto a specialty paper. Our giclées have passed the 75-year ink-fade test and are produced on acid free, pH balanced archival canvas. Each giclée is hand-signed by John Paul Strain and includes a "Certificate of Authenticity." We custom frame John Paul Strain paper giclées.    The Classic Canvas Giclée will be signed and numbered. Approximately 23" x 33" in size. 

Framed Artwork

These are special pieces of John Paul Strain Art that we have framed and available for you.